Andrew W.K.  YOU’RE NOT ALONE  LIVE IN CONCERT WITH HIS FULL BAND 2018

Saturn Presents:

Andrew W.K. YOU’RE NOT ALONE LIVE IN CONCERT WITH HIS FULL BAND 2018

Broncho

Thu. May 3, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Saturn

$20.00 - $22.00

This event is 18 and over

Andrew W.K.
Andrew W.K.
It all began with a feeling.
Of being alone and wanting to belong.
Of wanting to share that feeling of belonging.
And experience the euphoria of bonding with others.
The feeling became a dream.
To make the most exciting music imaginable.
Music that embraced and celebrated life in all its facets, electrifying and uniting everyone
who heard it.
The dream attained reality in major chords pounded out on piano, an unrelenting four-to-
the-floor beat, a set of dirty whites, a bloody nose.
And found its voice with these words:
"When it's time to party, we will party hard."
It's safe to say, nobody has partied harder, longer or more fervently than the undisputed
King of Partying himself, Andrew W.K.. A one-man music machine possessed of a
single-minded, monomaniacal focus to spread a singular message:
That to party is to exist.
And to exist is to party.
This mission he embarked upon in 2001, with the release of his debut single and
signature tune "Party Hard," and has never swerved from since. Released the same
year, his debut album I Get Wet, an instant, ageless classic, was a full-throated
declaration of that hedonistic intent. Twelve songs, no ballads, delivered at breakneck
speed and with maximum intensity from beginning to end. All the bluntness, passion and
classicism of rock 'n' roll, boiled down and purified to its base elements.
Power. Movement. Melody. Emotion. Noise.
A sound simultaneously life-affirming, enervating and overwhelming.
A sound that obliterates ego and bludgeons self.
As an artist, he seemed to have emerged out of nowhere, fully-formed right out of the
box, with an image, a style, and a sense of purpose that set him far apart from his peers.
If that seemed to good to be true, then maybe it was. Andrew W.K., the critics opined,
was either the savior of music or its biggest fraud. Either deadly serious or an elaborate
prank. None of which bothered the fans who took up the mantle of the Andrew W.K.

ethos, to live every moment as if it was simultaneously their first and their last. Live
shows, backed by a six-piece band of hard-driving musicians, became a collective
celebration of unbridled joy that often turned entire dance floors into a giant, whirling
circle pit of jostling bodies, with sweat and hair flying, and ended in a mass stage
invasion that tore down the boundary between artist and audience.
Two years later came The Wolf, an album that doubled as a manual for self-realization,
blending the personal with the philosophical, drawing on the past to forge a path towards
the future, then folding back on itself like a Möbius strip, invoking an existence with no
beginning, no end, seamless. From this point on, his fans became his friends and allies
in a cause undertaken purely for its own sake; an idea explored further in a 2004 MTV
series, Your Friend, Andrew W.K., where he offered himself up as cheerleader and life
coach, helping others to realize themselves and their dreams.
A third album in 2006, Close Calls With Brick Walls, as ambitious in scope and sound as
it was oblique in theme and tone, suggested an artist who seemed to have freed himself
from all the restrictions placed upon him, by himself and by others, who had peered into
a looking glass and seen... his mirror image, staring back. Everything that he was and
everything that he wasn't, merged into one. A series of reflections arching backwards
into infinity. Multiple images of a face with the same forced smile. As if Andrew W.K., the
performer, had been replaced by a different person entirely.
The rumors that had persisted since the very beginning of his career, began to multiply
and take hold, begging the question: not who is Andrew W.K., but what is Andrew W.K.?
A person, a persona, a wig. An entity, a corporation or a symbol. An enigma behind a set
of initials.
That question would remain unanswered as, over the next decade, Andrew W.K.
adopted a dizzying array of roles that took him into virgin territory for a rock 'n' roll
musician, establishing a unique place for himself in popular culture, as a ubiquitous
celebrity presence, while at the same time calling into question the very nature of that
celebrity. Advice columnist, university lecturer, and children's game show host. Nightclub
impresario, talk radio personality and talk show guest. Motivational speaker and cultural
ambassador. Performance artist and magician's assistant. Party philosopher and
weatherman. He was all these things and more.
Now, as he readies the release of a brand new album of rock music, his first in over a
decade, and prepares to embark on his first full-band tour in five years, Andrew W.K.
has come full circle to celebrate a party still raging strong.
A party that is now and forevermore.
Because the party never dies.
Broncho
Broncho
Stick your head out the window and sniff the air: there’s a blizzard of badness brewing, and it’s not blowing over anytime soon. Sure, the political leaders, bullies, and other villains of various venoms are dominating the headlines, but these days the list of troublemakers extends well beyond the usual suspects.
From their home base in the Heartland, Tulsa, Oklahoma’s BRONCHO have a unique vantage point from which to survey the sins. Churning out thoughtful, nuanced rock and roll with an art school spirit and a punk rock heart since 2010, the band’s fourth album, Bad Behavior, finds them leaning into their strengths for their strongest effort yet. Following the catchy, playful vibe of previous albums Can’t Get Past the Lips (2011) and Just Enough Hip to Be Woman (2014), as well as the deliberate sonic intent of 2016’s sludgy, moodier art piece Double Vanity, the new record reveals BRONCHO’s fly-on-the-crumbling-wall vision of our moral climate, complete with a reenergized, accessible sound and the charmingly sardonic, smiling-while-sneering delivery of singer and bandleader Ryan Lindsey.
“It’s a reflection of the current world: everybody’s been acting badly over the last few years so we made a record about it,” Lindsey says. “There are multiple ways of portraying something as ‘bad,’ and there are moments of self- reflection throughout the record as though we could be talking about ourselves—but not necessarily. It’s observational, like we’re looking through muddy binoculars from a distance. It’s a blurry mirror image of the times from where we sit.”
Lindsey (vocals/guitar) and the band—Nathan Price (drums), Ben King (guitar), and Penny Pitchlynn (bass)—are a tight unit who have seen their songs featured at influential TV and radio and have toured the U.S. and Europe, including arenas with the likes of Queens of the Stone Age, The Growlers, Portugal.The Man, and Cage The Elephant. In the gritty warehouse district of Downtown Tulsa they have carved out a physical place for themselves, an industrial blank space where BRONCHO can experiment with sounds, performance, visuals, and more. It’s where they recorded Bad Behavior with producer Chad Copelin in the first half of 2018, a controlled process that allowed them to work at their own pace and by their own standards, almost like a secret club.
Bad Behavior slinks and purrs with a sense of lascivious flirtation. Lindsey sings with a mischievous twinkle in his voice, peppering his verses with suggestive uh-ohs and ahhs and at times barely pushing out his words to the point of whispering. Lines like “You caught me in the weekend/You caught me with your boyfriend” (“Weekend”) and “I got a thing for your mother/I got a thing to teach your father” (“Family Values”) match the primal pulse of the songs’ moods and vibes, and their pop sensibilities create a world where T. Rex, Tom Petty, The Cars, and The Strokes collide. “Keep It in Line” chimes along to a driving, pepped-up beat and serves as both the album’s catchiest moment and its closest swerve toward ethical commentary, as Lindsey’s narrator demands to be reminded of his place in the world while attempting to submit to his misgivings. The result is less an act of penance and more of honest reproach, an ultimate judgment that is matched in its directness only by the following track, “Sandman,” an overt yearning for pleasure that Lindsey calls the band’s answer to The Chordettes classic “Mr. Sandman.”
The record is filled with references to religion, sin, drugs, vice, and scandal bubbling just under the surface. It’s a palette familiar to anyone who has ever turned on the evening news, which Lindsey admits was a huge influence on him. “Through the writing process I watched a lot of CNN, and man there’s a lot of bad behavior there,” he says. “Not to mention that there’s a company making money off of people watching their depiction of it all. From an entertainer’s standpoint I get what they’re doing, calling everything ‘breaking news’ and keeping people glued, but taking up that kind of space can’t be good for society. Although it’s pretty fun to watch.”
Can all this unsavory activity exist without taking sides? Lindsey holds tight to his role as a relayer and is comfortable with leaving it to the audience to cast their own lot. “We’re assuming that everybody is coming from a
certain set of values, but ultimately that’s impossible,” he says. “There’s a lot of people who think a certain way about the world and aren’t as shocked by these things. Maybe we’re simply trying to start the conversation. The best news is just a report of what’s going on, without bias. This record is a non-biased, non-profit reporting on what’s going on in the world. Part of it’s an exploration in solving those problems, on a personal level and ultimately on a cultural level.”
Bad Behavior represents a picture of a band that have crushed their own commercial expectations and are doing what they want to do at their own pace. They’ve cleaned the slate and quietly made a return with urgent, bonafide pop songs. If you want to catch a whiff of Bad Behavior, simply stick your head out the window and breathe.
Venue Information:
Saturn
200 41st Street S
Birmingham, AL, 35222
http://www.saturnbirmingham.com/